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Where Ecommerce goes wrong »

Posted on September 24th, 2014 at 12:09 in User Behavior, User Experience, Video.

You may laugh, but this kind of stuff happens online all the time. And it’s not limited to Ecommerce – there are online donation flows, sign-ups, nomination forms, you name it – all of which can benefit from a bit of extra developer care, google analytics attention and usability love.

What happens when Nick4ever visits YOUR web shop?

Author: Marianne Kjær Jensen
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12 Step Landing Page Rehab »

Posted on September 12th, 2014 at 13:09 in Campaigns, User Experience.

Had a look at your Google Analytics stats lately? If not, you may want to have a look at those conversion rates – have they dropped, decreased or just never been where they ought to be? If it looks like your landing pages have fallen off the wagon – there is help to be had. Oli Gardner of Unbounce.com has written a 12 step program to help clean up your conversion funnel that’s so chalk full of great tips that even the worst offences (like sending campaign traffic directly to your home page) will get the help they need.

Read the article here: http://moz.com/blog/the-12step-landing-page-rehab-program

Author: Marianne Kjær Jensen
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DHL Agency & Tech Run 2014 »

Posted on September 5th, 2014 at 14:09 in Video.

For the second year in a row, Plant invited a bunch of agency friends and tech startups to join us for the DHL Relay Race (DHL Stafetten) in Copenhagen, the largest non-competitive running event in the world. The race consists of a 5 kilometer run, with relay teams of five. After the run we celebrated our efforts with barbecue, beer and jazz. Check out the video from this year’s event below.

If you’re interested in joining us next year, all sign-up info is gathered at dhl.plant.dk. We hope to see you there!

Author: kajsa
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Evolving the Touchpoint »

Posted on August 15th, 2014 at 13:08 in User Behavior, User Experience.

Touchpoint. It’s one of those 500 buzzwords we see and hear and use on a daily basis and take for granted as far as givens are concerned. We know our clients (and clients customers) are interacting with their brands online, in-person, on the phone and in countless ad forms. We understand that every touchpoint is an opportunity to communicate brand value and to influence customer behavior – but have we really given much thought to what it means and how we make designing for touchpoints something tangible, specific and most importantly: actionable?

Chris Risdon, Design Director at Adaptive Path, has and he’s written a stellar article about Un-sucking the Touchpoint – or in other words, evolving the definition of touchpoint from something that is channel focused to something that involves designing for a specific human need at a specific time and place. When we look at touchpoints from this perspective (when we understand customer context and need) it becomes something specific that we can design for – whether that’s a specific interaction or an interface control. It’s microinteraction level we’re looking at here, and it makes a lot of sense.

Author: Marianne Kjær Jensen
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Container Model Content »

Posted on July 4th, 2014 at 13:07 in Content, Responsive, User Experience.

There has been a lot of very relevant discussion lately about container model content and COPE methodology (Create Once, Publish Everywhere). The approach speaks well to addressing issues of layout across multiple platforms and the need to think flexibility into the way we look at content.

Adaptive content, when structured well, respects flow, findability, readability and overall cohesion. It allows content curators to define elements once that can then be pushed out to various platforms in varying arrangements to best suit platform and situation. Whether we’re talking chunks, modules, or components – the shift in thinking is the same: we look at content first, and structure components accordingly. This is distinct departure from  the layout-first-content-later approach a lot of us have been working with up until relatively recently, and we’re starting to see this shift in a lot of places.

Nick Haley wrote a fantastic article recently about The Guardian newspaper’s new approach to content:

“With the container model we move away from thinking about specific pages on the site and how they might be filled with content, instead we start first with the content and each page is simply seen as a series of containers, whether we are designing the homepage, a section page like football, an article or live blog. The final order of those containers is the one which makes most sense to the business and our audience, something we discovery by testing.”

Read the rest of the article for more detail about blended containers and content curation that seeks to provide the best possible experience for users on any device.

Resources:
http://next.theguardian.com/blog/container-model-blended-content/

Author: Marianne Kjær Jensen
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Collaborative Kick Starts »

Posted on June 19th, 2014 at 14:06 in Design, User Experience.

A recent article from Ryan Holms (Founder of Invoke) tackles the age old question of what start-ups should prioritize – design or engineering? Answer? Both. There isn’t anything under the hood without great engineering, but putting lipstick on an existing code base doesn’t work either.

We’re apt to agree: some of the projects we’ve been most proud of lately here at Plant have been the ones where we’ve got that bit right: with kick starts that have development and design putting their heads together from day one.

Read the entire article here: medium.com/@invoker/design-and-the-startup

Author: Marianne Kjær Jensen
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Let’s Talk About the Weather »

Posted on June 19th, 2014 at 11:06 in Social Media, Trends, User Experience.

Weather driven personalisation is capitalizing on an estimated $3 trillion in private sector business – via everything from mobile app and social mobile ads, to email campaigns to in-store digital signage. The combination of Weather Channel’s 75 years of weather pattern data and historical purchase patterns is enabling retailers to drive sales of argan oil to frizzy haired women on humid days, crisp cold brew to beer drinkers on hot days, and crafting materials to creatives on days leading up to extended periods of rain. The subject of weather just got a little more interesting, didn’t it.

Read more here: www.getelastic.com/why-weather-driven-personalization-is-hot-hot-hot/

Author: Marianne Kjær Jensen
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ESPN FC World Cup Essentials »

Posted on June 2nd, 2014 at 10:06 in Campaigns, Design, Responsive.

With the 2014 FIFA World Cup just around the corner, Microsoft is now the latest brand to show how it plans to get in on the tournament’s hype. Through a partnership between its Internet Explorer team and ESPN, both parties have teamed up to launch ESPN FC World Cup Essentials. By combining 3D graphics and detailed information pages, this new site aims to do more than just keep you well informed — it wants to do so in a beautiful and very interactive way. World Cup Essentials, which is part of the recent redesign to ESPN FC, will let you easily browse news and scores coming out of Brazil, and narrow them down by team or specific match. To complement this, there are visuals that make the experience a little more enjoyable; swiping from country to country under “Teams” instantly brings up artwork for key players, among other things.

What’s more, you can peruse notable headlines and other interesting details from past World Cups, going all the way back to the very first one in Uruguay (1930). While Microsoft says the website is “perfect for touch on Internet Explorer 11,” ESPN FC World Cup Essentials works with pretty much any browser, both on desktop and mobile devices.

Source: Engadget

Author: Martin Schultz
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Fearing the Long Format »

Posted on May 21st, 2014 at 14:05 in User Experience.

We find ourselves easing client fear of long formatted pages quite often – with fair reason given the holy position “above the fold” design has occupied for so many years. A recent article from Nielsen Norman Group comes therefore as a welcome sign (and tested proof) that times have changed.

While the article focuses on usability issues associated with accordion interface usage, the point is still clear: users scroll – as long as you give them good reason to. The heat tracking image above, from NNGroups research report “How People Read on the Web: The Eyetracking Evidence” shows how far and how much people read on a long page requiring a lot of scrolling. So while users spend considerably more attention above the fold, we needn’t fear the long page with a lot of content, as long as we present that content properly.

Source: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/accordions-complex-content/

Author: Marianne Kjær Jensen
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Micro UX Macro Effect »

Posted on May 10th, 2014 at 14:05 in Design, Trends, User Experience.

Of the many UX and design trends predicted for 2014: flat UI, mobile first, yet more scrolling, less text, minimalist navigation, video backgrounds – one that we’re especially loving is micro UX. This ‘design is in the details’ approach is guided by principles aimed at bringing the data forward, preventing human error, speaking human, providing feedback long loops and setting smart defaults (don’t start from zero).

Clean, clever and often subtle details can make a huge impact on user experience – so when we see a great example, we sit up and take notice. Here are a couple of recent finds we’ve found inspiring:

1. Daily Beasts progress indicator. The article menu double duties as a 5 piece progress bar.
2. Hulu.com’s search box, which is designed in 3 states: subtle when inactive so that it doesn’t distract from the video stream, brighter when the user needs and interacts with it and lastly – filled with a white background when the user types so that it is easier to read.

For further reading check out:
eConsultancy: 18 Pivotal Web Design Trends for 2014
FastCo Design: The Future of UX Design: Tiny, Humanizing Details

Author: Marianne Kjær Jensen
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